The Forest Scout

Quote Story: Wednesday, March 14 Walkout at LFHS

Back to Article
Back to Article

Quote Story: Wednesday, March 14 Walkout at LFHS

Emma Riley

Hang on for a minute...we're trying to find some more stories you might like.


Email This Story






All of the quotes compiled for this story are accurate, yet the students who participated were granted anonymity at their request. 

With the walkout planned for today, March 14 at 10 a.m., to say it’s a hot topic in the halls would be an understatement. Everyone, from seniors all the way down to freshman, is talking about the event, but more importantly, many have differing opinions on the issue. In an effort to understand where our student body stands on this topic, I surveyed students anonymously out and reached out to some teachers pertaining to whether or not they are walking out and why. Here is what they had to say:

Those who are walking out:

“It’s just respect. I’m doing it out of respect, I want to take a moment of silence for the 17 victims and I believe that there should be gun laws enhanced in the future, like raising the age to buy a gun to 21.”

“We don’t really have a choice anymore because it’s either you walk out or sit in the commons, so I might as well walk out.”

“My thoughts do not align with the 2nd amendment and I want to honor the lives of the 17 innocent high schoolers who were murdered by someone who should never had the opportunity to buy an assault rifle.”

“I think politicians need to take action to protect people in schools and Americans simply about their lives without standing up is unacceptable. There is no reason why we should have so many gun homicides in the US and not do anything about it.”

“I want to respect the kids who died.”

“It’s something to remember the 17 victims and even though I don’t know them personally, it’s something that could happen at any school at any time. It’s something I’m doing out of respect. I am not a fan of guns and I don’t think ordinary citizens should have them.”

“I want to show my support for all of the victims from the Parkland school. Beyond that, I think it’s important to pay respect to the Parkland victims no matter what your stance is on gun control.”

“To honor the 17 lives–that was the point of the walkout. I know that there is a lot of talk about what the walkout is really about, but I’m walking out to honor the 17 lives.”

“Regardless of your opinions on gun control I think its important to honor the victims.”

“It sends a message to our representatives to pass laws to prevent shootings like this in the future.”

“I believe you have to bring attention to these issues.”

 

Those who are not walking out:

“People are saying they are doing this to help memorialize all these students and such, but they don’t know these students. They don’t know anything about this. They don’t know anything about the laws and they are just using it as an excuse and a ploy.”

“I think I would rather go find the kid that’s sitting alone that could be struggling to prevent something bad from happening. It’s nice to walk out, but I think there are other ways to honor them that are more proactive.”

“I hate how the school has gotten involved. It’s totally dividing the school. You’re either in the commons or on the front lawn. You can honor them in more than walking out and skipping out on class.”

“I feel like the school took away all of the significance from it. It’s not supposed to be regulated; it is supposed to be a statement that the students make. I also think that it’s too late now, we have waited too long to address it.”

“Just because we walk out it’s not going to change the views of anyone. It’s not going to go back in time and stop what already happened. This demonstration is not going to stop anything in the future”

 

Those who are undecided:

“I don’t want to come to school. Yes, I do want to pay a tribute to the people that died, but whether you stay in the commons or go outside you are making a statement and I feel like you’re going to be judged for what you do. There’s not even a neutral space, like staying in the classroom.”

“I feel like it’s turned into a total political campaign, so that makes me not want to do it, but I haven’t decided yet.”

“It’s going to be weird, whether you walk out or don’t, you are making some sort of  political statement.”

About the Writer
Emma Riley, Author

Emma Riley is a senior at Lake Forest High School. Emma spends her days golfing, thinking, and talking about fashion, or eating trendy foods.

Leave a Comment

If you want a picture to show with your comment, go get a gravatar.




Navigate Left
  • Quote Story: Wednesday, March 14 Walkout at LFHS

    0Carousel stories

    Commons Knowledge Special: College Knowledge – with guest host Drew Foley

  • Quote Story: Wednesday, March 14 Walkout at LFHS

    0Carousel stories

    SEC: It Just Means More

  • Quote Story: Wednesday, March 14 Walkout at LFHS

    0Carousel stories

    Golden Opportunity

  • Quote Story: Wednesday, March 14 Walkout at LFHS

    0Carousel stories

    Special Thursday Edition of the Friday Five

  • Quote Story: Wednesday, March 14 Walkout at LFHS

    In LFHS

    What about the future worries you most?

  • Quote Story: Wednesday, March 14 Walkout at LFHS

    Features

    Join CROYA for their Boot Scootin’ Barn Dance

  • Quote Story: Wednesday, March 14 Walkout at LFHS

    0Carousel stories

    Give Us Back Spotify!

  • Quote Story: Wednesday, March 14 Walkout at LFHS

    0Carousel stories

    How I Learned That Angels Are Real

  • Quote Story: Wednesday, March 14 Walkout at LFHS

    4 Your Information

    4 Your Information: Sleep Tight!

  • Quote Story: Wednesday, March 14 Walkout at LFHS

    Features

    The Dish: Isaac and Moishe

Navigate Right
The Student News Site of Lake Forest High School
Quote Story: Wednesday, March 14 Walkout at LFHS