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The Student News Site of Lake Forest High School

The Forest Scout

The Student News Site of Lake Forest High School

The Forest Scout

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Tips to Avoid a Junior Year Slump

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Although all years of high school hold high standards and can put pressure on students, junior year is often referred to as the most intense. This is widely spread across social media and even talked about within the school. Although becoming an upperclassman seems to be exciting, it initiates a new element of what a high school student must endure. 

This is portrayed across social media as the “junior year slump.” It is known as such because for some, junior year can cause a lack of sleep, free time, a demanding schedule, and other undesirable circumstances. When these conditions are combined it can generate a mental crash.

“Junior year is already the hardest year I’ve experienced in high school because you have to balance loads of school work as well as making time for sports, family, and friends. I already have an ACT tutor and it definitely adds another layer of stress in my life that I did not have in past years,” said junior McKenzy Hoopis. 

If the year has only just started and juniors are experiencing these things, how will they persevere through the rest of the year? It is true that this may happen, but is it inevitable? Is there a way that the whole thing can be avoided? Here are a few tips from current seniors on how they managed a way around the junior year slump:

“I used a planner each day to make sure I kept track of due dates and when I had tests. I definitely feel like that helped me stay organized so I could complete my assignments on time,” said senior Rachel Silvers. 

Another concern that many juniors face is not being able to balance the workload outside of school. 

“When I was a junior I made sure to be productive during my study halls in order to get ahead of the week, and that way I did not have to do as much at home,” said senior Logan Uihlein.

This strategy can be beneficial for many because it opens doors that allow you to have more free time after school.  Another method that was suggested was to make use of your teachers as resources. 

“I think utilizing PLT and emailing your teachers with questions is one thing I really relied on if I ever got confused. Using those things as an extra source helped me feel better about what I was learning,” said Silvers. 

 Not only does using your teachers to your advantage benefit you during the year but it can benefit you in the college process. 

“My best tip is to become close with your teachers because they are the ones who will be grading your papers and writing your rec letters,” said senior Tommie Aberle.

 Although junior year can be filled with lots of things causing stress, it is also important to do things that benefit your personal well-being. Looking after yourself should be a priority because nothing can be accomplished if one feels drained. Making sure that sleep deprivation is not an added inconvenience can only result in benefits. 

“One thing I did was make a goal for myself to go to bed and take a break from working by the latest at 11 o’clock,” said senior Scott Weston. 

Another strategy could be to look for alternative activities to relieve stress. 

Senior Sara Khater says “CROYA was honestly a great stress reliever during junior year. It was such a needed distraction and break from thinking about school and helped me make friends with people that were in my classes which made the school year way more enjoyable.” 

Therefore if you are in a positive mental state it makes accomplishing schoolwork that much easier. Although it may feel overbearing, there are many ways to be successful.

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About the Contributor
Sara Drowne
Sara Drowne, Staff Writer
Sara Drowne is a junior at Lake Forest High School. She plays field hockey for the school and is a part of Scout Nation. She is super excited to get more involved by being a first-time writer for The Forest Scout. When Sara has free time she likes to spend it hanging out with her friends and family, playing with her dog, watching movies, and shopping.
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    Sara KhaterSep 22, 2023 at 12:03 pm

    This is some heat

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